The timelines for filing workers’ compensation claims are crucial to obtain benefits. Missing these deadlines can mean application denials or extensive delays when you need help the most.

This article is a thorough digest of time limits to file for workers’ compensation in all 50 states. We explain in detail the requirements, state by state, to assist employees.

Knowing these details helps to secure long-term financial and medical futures. Timely filings help expedite procedures for claims and decrease the stress of uncertainty. Use this guide as an opportunity to gain confidence and find the legal help you need to secure workers’ compensation.

State-by-State Notification and Filing Deadlines

Workers’ compensation laws, requirements, and benefits differ widely. The result is a real maze of complexity. Therefore, all the timelines for reporting injuries and filing a claim are critical. These laws address particular economic and industrial conditions that exist in each state, balancing the needs and rights of both the employer and the employee.

Understanding workers’ compensation state-specific laws is not just knowing the deadlines, but also the procedures and documentation to file. That means some states may require immediate notification, while others allow the claimant a longer period. But there is also a wide range of experience concerning the statute of limitations for filing a formal claim.

The details of this information will go a long way in ensuring that the employee can satisfy all criteria necessary for the process. This means a smoother process of making the claims and increasing their chances of getting the benefits on time. In this respect, this guide gives a clear and detailed overview of these state-specific requirements on behalf of injured workers. It empowers you to take the necessary steps to secure rights and benefits.

State-by-State Breakdown

Alabama

The time frame given in Alabama for reporting a workplace injury is quite strict. Employees only have five days to report their injuries.

Alabama state law is a little more lenient concerning workers’ compensation filing. Here, employees have up to two years from the date of the injury to file their claim. This time frame allows workers to understand fully the injuries they have sustained and how they can affect their capabilities.

Alaska

Workers in Alaska must notify their employers of on-work injuries within 30 days. This is rather a liberal notification time compared to some other states and allows employees a good time to first realize, and then report the injury.

In Alaska, there is a statutory period of two years from the date of injury to complete the workers’ claim. This extended period gives workers enough time to find out how their injuries will affect them and make arrangements for gathering all the necessary medical evidence for the case.

Arizona

By statute, an employee must report a work-related injury to their employer immediately. This timely notification is critical because it allows the employer to take the necessary steps to document the incident.

An employee in Arizona has up to one year from the date of the injury to file a formal claim. However, this action should happen as early as possible to prevent any lapses in documentation or processing.

Arkansas

State law requires an Arkansas employee to notify their employer immediately when a work-related injury occurs. Timely reporting prevents disputes over the occurrence of the injury and ensures that all relevant steps happen.

An Arkansan worker may file a formal claim up to two years from the date of the injury. However, they need to handle this task with sufficient time to avoid problems.

California

State statutes require an employee to notify their employer of a work-related injury within 30 days in California. Prompt reporting helps avoid disputes.

Under the California statute of limitation, a worker has a maximum period of one year from the date of injury to file their claim. Early filing will smooth out the claims process for faster benefits.

Colorado

Under Colorado state law, a worker who sustains an injury should inform their employer about the injury within four days. The essence of timely notification is that it gives room for documentation of the incident.

An employee in Colorado must file a formal claim no later than two years from the date of injury. However, it should happen as early as possible to avoid costly delays or unnecessary legal challenges.

Connecticut

An employee must complete a report of any work-related injury to a Connecticut employer within a year. Notification is essential because it allows the employer to document the incident and start workers’ compensation procedures.

An employee in Connecticut may also have a formal claim up to one year from the date of the injury. The earlier the filing, the better the chances of assembling evidence for a smoother claims procedure.

Delaware

By law, Delaware requires an injured employee to report the work-related injury to his or her employer within 90 days. Timely reporting helps ensure no disagreements regarding whether or not the injury occurred.

An employee in Delaware has two years from the date of his or her injury to be able to file a formal claim. This step should take place as early as possible so that nothing will be missed in terms of documentation and processing.

Florida

An employee in Florida must notify his or her employer of an on-the-job injury within 30 days. That timely notice is vital since it allows the employer to document the incident immediately.

Then, you must file a formal claim regarding an incident within two years of its occurrence. Learn from the mistakes of others and seek early assistance to collect all required supporting medical records and evidence.

Georgia

Under Georgia law, an employee must, within 30 days, notify the employer of a work-related injury. Reporting promptly is important to an employer and will require documentation.

An employee in Georgia may claim up to one year from the date of their injury. However, this action should occur as soon as possible to avoid delays or denials.

Hawaii

An employee in Hawaii must report a work-related injury to their employer within 30 days. Such timely notification to the employer is indispensable for the employer to work with the ILAT.

The statute of limitations is up to two years from the date of the injury to file a formal claim. Filing as soon as possible will allow an employee to gather supporting evidence needed for approval.

Idaho

An Idaho employee must notify any work-related injury to his or her employer within 60 days. Timely reporting will avoid disputes over whether an injury occurred.

You can file a formal claim up to one year from the date of the injury. However, this action should occur efficiently to ensure a smoother process.

Illinois

Workers in Illinois must inform their employer within 45 days of a work-related accident. The reason for early reporting is to prevent denial of the injury ever having taken place.

The overall statute of limitations is three years from the date of injury. This legal doctrine exists for those who cannot reasonably connect an illness or injury to their job until later.

Indiana

Employees have 30 days to notify their employer of a work-related injury under Indiana law. It provides the employer with sufficient time to investigate the circumstances and complete the necessary documentation.

The state gives two years from the date of the injury for the formal claim. The lengthier time window allows workers to understand the extent of their injuries and which benefits they need.

Iowa

Iowa requires that an employee to report a work-related injury within 90 days. A claimant who does not report such an injury within such time may forfeit eligibility.

The formal compensation claim must happen within two years of the injury or illness. This time frame should give an employee ample opportunity to seek proper medical care and find legal help.

Kansas

A workers’ work-related injury shall be reported to the employer in Kansas within 20 days. The notification may happen orally or in writing.

The statute of limitation to formally file for workers’ compensation in Kansas is 200 days from the date of injury. This period is relatively short compared to other states.

Kentucky

In Kentucky, workers have a requirement to inform their employer about a work-related injury immediately. There must also be proof that the condition is work-related.

In Kentucky, the statute of limitations for filing is two years from the date of injury or the last voluntary payment of income benefits, whichever is later. In addition, it is advantageous to learn the state-specific benefits available for the application.

Louisiana

An employee has 30 days to report a workplace injury in the State of Louisiana. Such reporting may be made in writing or by word of mouth, though being timely is critical for approval.

The total statute of limitations for filing of a formal workers’ compensation claim is one year from the date of injury or illness. This period is relatively short, especially if you do not discover problems after significant time has passed.

Maine

An employee must notify the employer of a work-related injury within 30 days in Maine. You can complete this requirement verbally or in writing. Additionally, GSIS can do so in writing on your behalf.

Workers in Maine have a two-year statute of limitations to file a claim for workers’ compensation. The Maine Workers’ Compensation Board is instrumental in approving and providing resources.

Maryland

In Maryland State, an employee should report a work injury up to 10 days after its occurrence. Failure to notify an employer within this time frame can complicate or even deny the workers’ compensation benefits.

The statute of limitations to file a formal workers’ compensation claim in Maryland is two years from the date of the injury. It can also help workers deal with their claims efficiently to know the mission and services of the Maryland Workers’ Compensation Commission and how to benefit from them properly.

Massachusetts

The general requirement in Massachusetts for an employee to report a work-related injury to an employer is as soon as possible. The state does not require a specific time frame related to notification. Nonetheless, a quick notification is vital for a smoother approval and benefits process.

The statute of limitations to file a formal workers’ compensation claim is four years from when the employee becomes aware of the causal relationship between their employment and injury. This gives the workers an extended period to understand the full effect of their injuries and establish a medical need.

Michigan

In Michigan, an employee has 90 days to notify their employer of a work-related injury. Workers can do so in writing or orally, but in a timely fashion to get the workers’ compensation process started.

Under Michigan law, workers have two years from their date of injury to file a formal workers’ compensation claim.

Minnesota

In Minnesota, the requirement is that a worker must report a work-related injury to the employer within 14 days. This relatively short notification period illustrates the need to act promptly.

The statute of limitations to filing a compensation claim is three years from the date of injury in Minnesota. Workers have this period to understand the extent of their injuries and collect all the necessary details.

Mississippi

An employee has 30 days after the date of injury to notify the employer of a work-related injury in Mississippi. Notice may be provided in writing or orally.

Under Mississippi law, the statute of limitations in which to file a formal workers’ compensation claim is two years from the date of injury. This gives them enough time to assess the extent of damage in their injuries and talk to medical specialists.

Missouri

In Missouri, workers are required to inform an employer about a work-related injury within 30 days. Workers have the right to report an injury both verbally and in writing, but they are obligated to provide details.

Under Missouri law, a compensation claim must be filed within two years of the injury or illness. or the last day that compensation was paid to you, whichever is later. Filing early enough ensures that all the necessary evidence is collected on time, thus helping to make claims processes smoother and bringing benefits faster.

Montana

Any employee in Montana has 30 days to report their injury to his or her employer after it occurred at work. Such notification, whenever possible, ought to be put in writing to create an exact record.

The statute of limitation to file a formal workers’ compensation claim is one year from the date of the injury. This rather short period emphasizes that the employee should file a claim fast.

Nebraska

In Nebraska, it is required that employees report an injury from work to the employer within 30 days, either verbally or in writing. Then, the approval process involved in workers’ compensation may begin.

The statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in Nebraska is two years from the date of injury. This provides employees with adequate time to understand the full extent of their injuries and acquire medical recommendations.

Nevada

An injured employee in Nevada is required to inform his or her employer of an employment injury within 7 days. Such notice needs to be in writing to create a record. Timely notice avoids potential disputes about occurrence and ensures that the proper processes are followed.

The statute of limitations in Nevada for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim is 90 days from the date of injury. This relatively short period makes it incumbent upon the worker to file quickly.

New Hampshire

Workers are required to notify an employer about an on-the-job injury immediately, on the day if possible. That prompt notification may be oral or in writing.

Under New Hampshire law, a two-year statute of limitations from the date of injury gives time for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim.

New Jersey

In New Jersey, employees must report a work-related injury to their employer within 90 days. This notification can be verbal or written, but it is crucial to act within this timeframe.

The statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in New Jersey is two years from the date of the injury or the last payment of compensation, whichever is later. This period provides workers with adequate time to assess the full extent of their injuries.

New Mexico

Your immediate supervisor in New Mexico should know about the injury or illness within 15 days. Reporting on time helps to establish an accurate record of the incident clearly and prevent disputes.

The statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in New Mexico is one year from the date of injury. Alternatively, you can have up to one year from the date you first knew or should have known that his injury was work-related.

New York

In New York, employees must report a work-related injury to their employer within 30 days. This notification can be verbal or written, but it is essential to act within this timeframe to ensure the injury is properly documented.

The statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in New York is two years from the date of the injury. This period allows workers sufficient time to understand the full extent of their issues.

North Carolina

In North Carolina, employees must report a work-related injury to their employer within 30 days. Prompt reporting helps establish a clear record of the incident, preventing disputes about the injury’s occurrence and supporting your claim’s validity.

The statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in North Carolina is two years from the date of the injury or the last payment of medical compensation, whichever is later.

North Dakota

In North Dakota, employees must report a work-related injury to their employer immediately. This notification can be verbal or written, but it is essential to act promptly.

The statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in North Dakota is one year from the date of the injury or from the date the employee knew or should have known that the injury was work-related.

Ohio

In Ohio, the requirement for reporting job-related injuries is as soon as possible to an employer. There is no statutory deadline for reporting the injury, although prompt notification is very important for adequate documentation.

Ohio’s statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim is one year from the date of the injury. This allows the employee time to fathom the extent of the injuries and to obtain the appropriate medical documentation.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma requires that workers notify an employer about a work-related injury within 30 days. This can be done either in writing or verbally; however, it must be given within the aforementioned time frame.

In such regard, part of Oklahoma statute requires the filing of a formal claim for workers’ compensation within two years from the date of the injury or the last date of authorized medical treatment. This offers more time to fully assess his injuries and medical evidence.

Oregon

In Oregon, employees must report a work-related injury to their employer within 90 days. This notification can be verbal or written.

The statute of limitations for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in Oregon is one year from the date of the injury. The alternative is from the date the employee becomes aware of the injury’s connection to their employment.

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, an employee must report a workplace injury to his or her employer within 120 days from the date of his or her injury. Verbal or written notification is permitted, but it would be prudent to do so within this duration so that the injury is documented and serves as a record of the incident.

Under Pennsylvania state law, there is a three-year statute of limitations to file a formal workers’ compensation claim. This long period gives the employees enough time to realize how badly they have been injured and secure all the medical reports.

Rhode Island

Under the laws in Rhode Island, a worker must report a work-related injury to the employer within 30 days. The notification is usually in writing or may be done orally; whatever means, the point is to give it within this period so that documentation is adequate and compensation can get underway.

Under Rhode Island law, a formal workers’ compensation claim must be filed within two years from the date of injury. This gives the employee sufficient time to fully realize the extent of their injuries and to acquire all the needed medical documentation.

South Carolina

In South Carolina, the employee should provide the employer with notification of a work-related injury within 90 days from the date of occurrence. The reporting may be in writing or verbal, and it is necessary for the course of the workers’ compensation process.

Regarding the filing of a workers’ compensation claim in South Carolina, the statute of limitations is two years from the date of the injury. This length of time afforded to workers enables them to realize fully the extent of their injuries and collect the proper medical documentation.

South Dakota

In the state of South Dakota, an employee must inform the employer about a job-related injury within three business days. Such reporting may be in writing or orally, though it must be done in this very short period to ensure that the injury is on record for workers’ compensation.

Under the statute of limitations, South Dakota provides two years from the date of the alleged injury to file a formal workers’ compensation claim. However, to avoid such glitches in the documentation or even unprecedented delays, it is advisable to file the claim early.

Tennessee

In Tennessee, the requirement for workers to notify employers in case of a job-related injury is within 15 days. Notice may be verbal or written, but it is of vital importance to have the injury reported within this time.

A formal claim for Tennessee workers’ compensation benefits must happen within one year from the date of injury or the date of the last authorized treatment or wage replacement benefit, whichever is later.

Texas

Under Texas law, an employee has 30 days to notify an employer about a job-related injury. One may do this both orally and in writing; however, conducting it within this period is quite important for appropriate documentation.

The statute of limitations in which to formally file a workers’ compensation claim in Texas is one year from the date of injury. This is a strict limitation for a worker to fully realize the extent of their injuries and gather medical records.

Utah

In Utah, workers have 180 days to notify an employer about a work-related injury. Workers give this notification either orally or in writing, though one needs to take these steps within this generous timeframe for proper documentation.

The statute of limitations for the filing date of a formal workers’ compensation claim in Utah is one year from the date of injury. 

Vermont

In Vermont, an employee has only 72 hours to notify his or her employer of a job-related injury, either verbally or in writing. This is important to do so within such a short amount of time so that the injury is properly recorded and the workers’ compensation process can begin.

Under Vermont law, a workers’ compensation claim must be filed within six months of the date of injury. This relatively short period serves to highlight the need for speed in filing a claim.

Virginia

In Virginia, an employee must notify his or her employer of any work-related injury within 30 days of the incident. This can be in either oral or written form.

The statute of limitations provided for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in Virginia State is two years from the date of the injury. This period aids the employees in fully comprehending the degree of their injuries and gives medical documentation for staff who have incurred any work-related injury.

Washington

In Washington, a worker must report an on-the-job injury to an employer immediately from the date of the injury or as soon as possible. There isn’t a statutory specific time limit within which the employee is required to report the injury to the employer.

The statute of limitations in Washington State is one year from the date of injury or illness. There may be an exception for symptoms that do not become apparent until after this period.

Washington, D.C.

An employee has 30 days to report the work-related disease or injury to his employer in Washington, D.C. Both verbal and written notices are allowed, but the prompt reporting of such an occurrence allows proper documentation of the claim so that workers’ compensation can begin.

The statute of limitations to begin a formal workers’ compensation claim in Washington, D.C., is one year from the date of injury or the date the employee discovers the relationship of the injury to their employment.

West Virginia

In West Virginia, an employee who suffers a job-related injury shall give an employer notice of the occurrence of such injury immediately, preferably within a few days. The state does not specify any time limits, but timely reporting helps prove that the claimed injury is accurate.

Claims for workers’ compensation benefits in the state must happen within six months from the date of injury. But make sure to file as early as possible; issues with lost documentation and slowdowns are pretty common when it comes to processing.

Wisconsin

In the State of Wisconsin, an employee should notify the employer about a job-related injury within 30 days. This may be in writing or by word of mouth, but either way, it must happen within this timeframe.

Notably, under Wisconsin law, formal claims are subject to a two-year statute of limitations. This gives the worker enough time to be fully aware of the extent of the injury or illness.

Wyoming

In Wyoming, an employee must, within 72 hours, notify an employer of a work-related injury. It is possible to issue such notifications in person, in writing, or orally.

The statute of limitation for filing a formal workers’ compensation claim in Wyoming is one year from the date of the injury. This allows time to ascertain the extent of injuries and to develop medical proof.

Talk to a Local Workers’ Comp Attorney in Your State

Every state has a different need for reporting injuries and filing a claim. Missing the deadlines could end with rejection or long delays. Following through with stipulated timelines and procedures will make the process much smoother and significantly reduce stress.

Nonetheless, some situations call for legal help. You cannot avoid all complications by reporting injuries promptly or filing within the statute of limitations.

We have connected over five million people to attorneys in the United States. Contact our representatives today at (866) 345-6784 or complete this form for a referral to local legal assistance today!

State Workers’ Compensation Departments

Alabama Department of Labor

State of Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Industrial Commission of Arizona

Arkansas Workers Compensation Commission

California Division of Workers’ Compensation

Colorado Department of Labor and Employment

Connecticut Workers’ Compensation Commission

Delaware Department of Labor

Florida Department of Financial Services

Georgia State Board of Workers’ Compensation

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations

Idaho Industrial Commission

Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission

Workers’ Compensation Board of Indiana

Iowa Division of Workers’ Compensation

Kansas Workers Compensation Division

Kentucky Education and Labor Cabinet

Louisiana Workforce Commission

Maine Workers’ Compensation Board

Maryland Workers’ Compensation Commission

Massachusetts Department of Industrial Accidents

Michigan Workers’ Disability Compensation Agency

Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Division

Mississippi Workers’ Compensation Commission

Missouri Division of Workers’ Compensation

Montana Workers Compensation Management Bureau

Nebraska Workers’ Compensation Court

State of Nevada Department of Business & Industry Industrial Relations (DIR)

New Hampshire Department of Labor

New Jersey Division of Workers’ Compensation

New Mexico Workers’ Compensation Administration

New York Workers’ Compensation Board

North Carolina Industrial Commission

North Dakota Workforce Safety & Insurance

Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation

Oklahoma Workers’ Compensation Commission

Oregon Workers’ Compensation Division

Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry

Rhode Island Department of Labor & Training

South Carolina Workers’ Compensation Commission

South Dakota Department of Labor & Regulation

Tennessee Bureau of Workers’ Compensation

Texas Department of Insurance

Utah Labor Commission

Vermont Department of Labor

Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission

Washington State Department of Labor & Industries

Washington, DC Department of Employment Services

West Virginia Offices of the Insurance Commissioner

Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development

Wyoming Department of Workforce Services

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