State-by-State Workers’ Compensation Laws

Workers’ compensation is a state-run insurance program designed to support employees who are injured or fall sick on the job and includes benefits related to lost wages and medical expenses. 

Most states require that employers of any size carry workers’ comp insurance. However, how it works in each state can vary widely, including benefits, eligibility requirements, exemptions, duration of benefits, business requirements, and the application process.

In nearly all states, workers’ comp is available to both full-time and part-time employees at most businesses, though a few states have special exemptions for industries like domestic workers, farm/agricultural, or construction. It is common for states to exempt the owners of sole proprietorships from workers’ comp requirements, along with partners to a partnership, and corporate officers. Employees in high-risk occupations (usually firefighters and police) may also be exempt or subject to different rules.

Workers who live in one state but are employed in another are generally subject to the workers’ compensation laws of the state where they work, though there can be some overlap in these cases.

For more information about workers’ compensation laws, requirements, and limitations in your state, find the program administrator and visit their website or reach out with your specific questions. You may also wish to contact a local workers’ comp attorney who can help walk you through your responsibilities, the claims process, or any other issue with the program in your state.

Work With An Experienced Local Lawyer

Hire an experienced workers’ compensation attorney as soon as the insurer or your employer shows signs of making your recovery difficult. If your injury involves an occupational illness or a cumulative injury, you may also benefit from a knowledgeable lawyer. An attorney will fight on your behalf for your rights to benefits as well as for the maximum amount of compensation. Retain the help you need at this difficult time in your life.

Submit a request online or call us today at (866) 345-6784 to get in touch with an attorney in your area!

Alabama

Program Administrator: 

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees who work for a business with fewer than five part- or full-time employees;
  • Domestic workers;
  • Farm laborers;
  • Casual employees;
  • Municipalities with a population of 2,000 or fewer residents.

Covered Employees:

  • Most employees are covered under workers’ comp, as long as the employer has at least five full- or part-time employees. 

Benefits Provided:

  • The employee’s hospital, surgical and medical costs;
  • Two-thirds of the employee’s average weekly salary, up to the state maximum while they’re unable to work.

Alaska

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Commercial fishermen;
  • Contracted entertainers, taxi drivers, and real estate agents;
  • Drivers employed with transportation companies;
  • Sports officials, as long as they’re officiating an amateur event;
  • Non-commercial cleaners;
  • Part-time babysitters;
  • Part-time transient workers, such as those who harvest crops.

Covered Employees:

  • Businesses with at least one employee.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical expenses for up to two years following the injury, whether related to Temporary Total Disability (TTD), Temporary Partial Disability (TPD), Permanent Partial Impairment (PPI), or Permanent Total Disability (PTD).
  • Salary compensation checks (every two weeks), up to the state’s maximum weekly rates.

Arizona

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Casual employees;
  • Independent contractors. 

Covered Employees:

  • All employers that employ one or more full- or part-time individuals.

Benefits Provided:

  • Emergency room charges;
  • Doctor’s visits and fees;
  • Prescription medications;
  • Two-thirds of their weekly salary, subject to the state maximum.

Arkansas

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees who work for businesses with three or fewer employees;
  • Farm laborers;
  • Real estate agents;
  • Domestic workers;
  • Those who are self-employed; 
  • Individuals who work for religious, nonprofit, or charitable organizations.

Covered Employees:

  • Businesses with more than three employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • All reasonably necessary medical care related to workers’ comp claims;
  • Two-thirds of your average weekly wage, up to the state maximum.

California

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Sole proprietors;
  • Domestic employees;
  • Deputy sheriffs or clerks;
  • Those who work only for sustenance;
  • Persons officiating an amateur sporting event;
  • Volunteers with non-profit recreational camps.

Covered Employees:

  • All businesses with at least one employee must carry workers’ compensation coverage. In some instances, temporary, part-time, and even contracted employees are covered. 

Benefits Provided:

  • All medical expenses “reasonably required to cure or relieve” the employee’s injuries, up to a limited number of physician’s visits per year. 
  • Two-thirds of their salary, subject to the state’s maximum.

Colorado

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Inmates;
  • Volunteers;
  • Common or contract carrier drivers.

Covered Employees:

  • All employers who have one or more employees, whether they’re part-time, full-time, or family members, must carry workers’ compensation insurance.

Benefits Provided:

  • All related medical treatment;
  • Vocational rehabilitation;
  • Death benefits;
  • Funeral and burial costs;
  • Two-thirds of their wages prior to the injury, subject to the state maximum.

Connecticut

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Household employees working fewer than 26 hours per week;
  • Business owners and sole proprietors;
  • Members of LLCs;
  • Corporate officers;
  • Members of partnerships;

Covered Employees:

  • Part-time;
  • Full-time;
  • Seasonal.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical expenses and lost wages;
  • Temporary partial or total disability;
  • Disfigurement or scarring;
  • Living funds or other benefits (depending on individual eligibility);
  • Job retraining;
  • Relapse or recurrence benefits related to the previous injury.

Delaware

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Farmworkers;
  • Independent contractors.

Covered Employees:

  • All part- or full-time employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • All necessary medical treatment and/or hospitalization;
  • Temporary partial or total disability;
  • Permanent impairment compensation;
  • Disfigurement;
  • Death.

District of Columbia (D.C.)

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Sole proprietors;
  • Casual workers;
  • Unpaid volunteers.

Covered Employees:

  • All part or full-time employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • Temporary partial or total disability;
  • Permanent partial or total disability;
  • Disfigurement;
  • Medical expenses based on 113% of Medicare reimbursement amounts;
  • Two-thirds of their wages prior to the injury.

Florida

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Sole proprietors (outside of construction);
  • Partners in a partnership;

Covered Employees:

  • All other full- or part-time workers of organizations with four or more full-time employees;
  • Agricultural businesses with six or more regular and/or 12 or more seasonal workers, who work for more than 30 days;
  • Corporate officers (unless they elect to exempt themselves);
  • In the construction industry:
    • Sole proprietors, partners, and corporate officers (unless they elect to exempt themselves);
    • Contractors;

Benefits Provided:

  • Indemnity (for any injury that prevents an employee from working for more than seven days);
  • Temporary partial or total disability;
  • Permanent partial or total disability;
  • Medical treatment;
  • Reemployment assistance services.

Georgia

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Owners/sole proprietors;
  • Corporate officers may elect to waive coverage on themselves.

Covered Employees:

  • Full- or part-time workers at any business with three or more employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • All authorized medical bills/hospital bills;
  • Physical therapy and prescriptions;
  • Any medically necessary travel expenses;
  • Medical rehabilitation;
  • Vocational rehabilitation.
  • Two-thirds of the previous average weekly wage or up to $675 for accidents prior to or on July 1, 2019.

Hawaii

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Unpaid volunteers;
  • Students working for a school, university, or college club (in exchange for benefits like room and board or tuition);
  • Domestic workers earning less than $225 per year;
  • Some stockholders;
  • Real estate brokers and/or salespersons compensated entirely on commission.

Covered Employees:

  • All other full-time and part-time employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • All medical treatment;
  • Temporary partial and total disability;
  • Permanent partial and total disability;
  • Disfigurement;
  • Death;
  • Vocational rehabilitation.

Idaho

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Domestic workers;
  • Casual employees;
  • Sole proprietors;
  • Members of a sole proprietor’s household;
  • Aircraft pilots working in agriculture (crop dusters);
  • Real estate brokers and/or salespersons compensated entirely on commission.
  • Volunteer ski patrollers;
  • Officials of collegiate/secondary school athletics competitions.

Covered Employees:

  • All other part- and full-time workers.

Benefits Provided:

  • All medical expenses;
  • Temporary partial and total disability;
  • Permanent partial and total disability;
  • Death benefits.

Illinois

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Sole proprietors;
  • Partners in a partnership;
  • Corporate officers;
  • Members of LLCs.

Covered Employees:

  • All other full- and part-time employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • All medical expenses;
  • Temporary partial and total disability;
  • Permanent partial and total disability;
  • Death benefits;
  • Vocational rehabilitation.

Indiana

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Railroad employees engaged as:
    • Engineers;
    • Firemen;
    • Conductors;
    • Brakemen;
    • Flagmen;
    • Baggagemen;
    • Foremen.
  • Municipal employees of the fire department or police department;
  • Members of the municipal firefighters’ pension fund or police officers’ pension fund;
  • Employees of nonprofits;
  • Independent contractors working for nonprofit organizations;
  • School to work students;
  • Members of the Indiana general assembly.

Covered Employees:

  • All other part- or full-time employees;

Benefits Provided:

  • Two-thirds of the average weekly wage based on the past 52 weeks, subject to state maximums.
  • All medical expenses.

Iowa

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Persons employed in agriculture or by a relative;
  • Casual employees not working for the employer’s business or trade;
  • Service performed in or around the employer’s dwelling;
  • Employees who earn less than $1,500 per year from an employer; 
  • Police officers and firefighters, but only if they’re already covered under the Iowa pension fund;
  • Members of an LLC.

Covered Employees:

  • Most employees working under an Iowa-based contract made in Iowa or whose employment is principally located in the state.

Benefits Provided:

  • All reasonable and necessary medical care required to treat the injury;
  • No more than 80% of the employee’s weekly earnings, up to a maximum of $1,543.00.

Kansas

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Realtors who are also independent contractors;
  • Firefighters who are members of a firefighter’s relief association that’s waived workers’ compensation coverage;
  • Some owner-operated drivers already covered under an occupational accident insurance policy;
  • Employers with a gross annual payroll of $20,000 or less;
  • Some agricultural jobs.

Covered Employees:

  • Virtually all public sector and private employees, as long as employers have a payroll of more than $20,000.

Benefits Provided:

  • No compensation during the employee’s first week off work;
  • Afterward, two-thirds of the employee’s gross average weekly wage, up to $687.

Kentucky

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Agricultural employees;
  • Private domestic workers who work less than 40 hours per week;
  • Employees working for sustenance with charitable or religious organizations;
  • Employees already covered by Federal Act;
  • Voluntary rejects and carpools; 
  • Certain religious organizations.

Covered Employees:

  • Every person working in the course of business, profession, or occupation of an employer;
  • Employees who regularly sell or distribute newspapers on the street, to customers at their homes, or to their places of business.

Benefits Provided:

  • 66.6% of your average weekly salary, up to the state maximum;
  • Medical costs;
  • Temporary and permanent disability payments;
  • Death and burial benefits.

Louisiana

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of a private residence, a private unincorporated farm, railroads or other commerce vessels, certain musicians and performers, and those covered by certain federal laws;
  • Crop dusting or spraying airplane crews;
  • Officers and members on the boards of directors for certain non-profit organizations;
  • Landmen.

Covered Employees:

  • All employees, whether part-time, full-time, temporary, or seasonal.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical care;
  • Indemnity wage benefits;
  • Vocational rehabilitation services;
  • Death benefits.

Maine

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Seasonal or casual agriculture or aquaculture employees;
  • Laborers, but only if the employer carries at least $25,000 in liability insurance and at least $5,000 in medical payments coverage;
  • Domestic servants in a private home.

Covered Employees:

  • Almost all public and private employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical services;
  • Lost wages, subject to the legal limit;
  • Total and partial incapacity.

Maryland

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Agricultural employees who work for employers with fewer than three employees and have an annual payroll of less than $15,000.
  • An employee of a sole proprietor

Covered Employees:

  • Almost all employees, even if they’re the employer’s sole employee.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical treatments and hospital treatments, including: 
    • Doctor bills;
    • Hospital bills;
    • Physical therapy;
    • Prescriptions;
    • Other necessary expenses;
  • Partial income replacement (two-thirds of your average weekly wage, but not more than the State’s maximum).

Massachusetts

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • None, as long as employees don’t belong to a limited liability company (LLC), are not partners of a limited liability partnership (LLP), or sole proprietors of an unincorporated business.

Covered Employees:

  • Almost all employees, no matter the number of hours worked.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical bills related to the injury or illness;
  • Lost wages;
  • Vocational rehabilitation in some instances.

Michigan

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Those who work for employers with less than three employees, unless a single employee works 35 or more hours per week for 13-plus weeks.

Covered Employees:

  • Nearly all employees working for public and private employers.

Benefits Provided:

  • Wage replacement;
  • Medical costs;
  • Rehabilitation benefits;
  • Temporary total and partial disability;
  • Permanent total and partial disability.

Minnesota

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of sole proprietorships;
  • Employees of farm operations;
  • Employees of corporations whose stock is owned by 10 or fewer people;
  • Family farm operations;
  • Casual employees;
  • Household workers who earn less than $1,000 cash during a three-month period;
  • Independent contractors.

Covered Employees:

  • All employees who aren’t otherwise exempt.

Benefits Provided:

  • Wage loss;
  • Medical expenses;
  • Vocational rehabilitation.

Mississippi

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Domestic workers, farm laborers, and federal workers;
  • Employees of nonprofit, charitable, religious, or cultural organizations;
  • Federal workers;
  • Transportation and maritime employees already covered by federal workers’ comp insurance;
  • Independent contractors, unless they’re an employee of an independent contractor.

Covered Employees:

  • Most employees who are not otherwise exempt.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical bills;
  • Lost wages up to 66.6% of the injured worker’s wage (maximum of $398.93);
  • Temporary and permanent partial and total impairment.

Missouri

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of religious institutions;
  • Railroad, postal, and maritime workers already covered under federal laws;
  • Farm labor;
  • Domestic employees in a private home;
  • Private household occasional labor;
  • Real estate agents;
  • Direct sellers
  • Volunteers of a tax-exempt organization.

Covered Employees:

  • Employees of non-construction businesses with five or more employees;
  • Construction businesses with one employee;
  • In these instances, all part-time/casual laborers, full-time, or family members are eligible for workers’ comp insurance.

Benefits Provided:

  • Up to 66.6% of the injured worker’s average weekly wage;
  • Funeral expenses up to $5,000;
  • Temporary total disability benefits;
  • Permanent partial and permanent total disability benefits.

Montana

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Household, domestic, or casual employees;
  • Employees of a dependent family member;
  • Sole proprietors or working members of a partnership, limited liability partnership, or a member-managed limited liability company;
  • Real estate, securities, or insurance salesperson paid solely by commission;
  • Direct sellers;
  • Employees who only receive sustenance or aid in return for their work;
  • Railroad employees not engaged in railroad construction work.

Covered Employees:

  • Employees of most businesses with one or more employees are covered.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical benefits;
  • Lost wages;
  • Temporary total and partial disability;
  • Permanent total and partial disability;
  • Vocational rehabilitation;
  • Wrongful death.

Nebraska

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Federal employees;
  • Railroad employees;
  • Most volunteers;
  • Independent contractors;
  • Employees engaged in an agricultural operation.

Covered Employees:

  • Every employee working for a business with one or more employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • Two-thirds of your average weekly wage, with a weekly maximum of $914.
  • Medical costs;
  • Death benefits.

Nevada

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Casual employees;
  • Employees of sole proprietors and partnerships;
  • Corporate officers and LLC members.

Covered Employees:

  • All employees who work for employers with one or more employees.

Benefits Provided:

  • Temporary, permanent, and partial disabilities;
  • 0.6% of your average monthly wage per percent of impairment;
  • Medical benefits, including mileage reimbursement;
  • Vocational rehabilitation;
  • Death benefits and funeral expenses.

New Hampshire

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of sole proprietorships, 
  • Corporate officers;
  • Members of an LLC.

Covered Employees:

  • Every employee, whether full- or part-time.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical bills;
  • 60% of your lost wages after three days off work due to your injuries;
  • Temporary or partial disability;
  • Vocational rehabilitation;
  • Death benefits.

New Jersey

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Partners or members of an LLC;
  • Principal owners of sole proprietorships.

Covered Employees:

  • All employees of a corporation, partnership, LLC, and sole proprietorship.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical treatment;
  • Wage replacement up to 70% of the average weekly wage; 
  • Permanent and partial disability compensation;
  • Death benefits.

New Mexico

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of businesses with two or fewer workers;
  • Domestic servants;
  • Real estate agents;
  • Federal employees covered by federal programs; 
  • Executive employees or sole proprietors, although their numbers contribute to workers’ compensation requirements.

Covered Employees:

  • All employees of businesses with three or more workers.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical care, including mileage reimbursement;
  • Permanent partial or total impairment;
  • Temporary indemnity benefits;
  • Survivor benefits;
  • Dispute resolution.

New York

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Businesses with no employees, no unpaid volunteers, and no subcontractors;
  • Business partnerships and corporations owned by one or two persons.

Covered Employees:

  • All employees of for-profit businesses that employ any persons other than the owners.

Benefits Provided:

  • Average weekly wage;
  • Medical services;
  • Temporary and permanent disability;
  • Death benefits; 
  • Legal protections for employers against related lawsuits for on-the-job injuries and illnesses.

North Carolina

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Certain railroad employees;
  • Casual employees;
  • Domestic servants employed by a household;
  • Farm laborers with fewer than ten full-time, non-seasonal employees;
  • NC federal government employees;
  • Certain sellers of agricultural products.

Covered Employees:

  • Employees of businesses that employ three or more persons.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical care;
  • Vocational rehabilitation;
  • Death benefits and funeral expenses;
  • Permanent/temporary, partial/total disability.

North Dakota

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • No entities are exempted.

Covered Employees:

  • Almost all employees, including full-time, part-time, seasonal, occasional workers, and independent contractors.

Benefits Provided:

  • Wage loss;
  • All reasonable and necessary medical treatments, including:
    • The cost of doctors’ visits;
    • Hospital bills;
    • Prescriptions;
    • Prosthetic devices;
  • Permanent/temporary, partial/total disability.

Ohio

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employers and employees whose religion objects to the payment and acceptance of insurance benefits.

Covered Employees:

  • All employees of businesses with one or more employee.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical benefits;
  • Permanent and temporary partial and total disability;
  • Lost wages;
  • Death benefits to survivors;
  • Facial disfigurement;
  • Living maintenance;
  • Percent of partial disability benefits.

Oklahoma

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Domestic or household employees with a total payroll of less than $10,000 per year;
  • Agricultural or horticultural employees with a total payroll of less than $100,000 per year;
  • Some licensed real estate agents and brokers;
  • Employees covered under federal laws;
  • Independent contractors.

Covered Employees:

  • Almost every employee hired in Oklahoma or injured in Oklahoma.

Benefits Provided:

  • Lost wages, up to a maximum of $923.53 per week;
  • Disability;
  • Medical expenses;
  • Rehabilitation costs;
  • Accidental death.

Oregon

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of sole proprietorships;
  • Business partners;
  • Private residence workers;
  • Casual laborers;
  • Corporate officers who serve on the board of directors and own at least 10% of the stock.

Covered Employees:

  • Most businesses with employees must provide workers’ compensation coverage.

Benefits Provided:

  • Lost wages, minus the first three days of unemployment;
  • Medical expenses related to your illness or injury;
  • Permanent and temporary, partial and total disability benefits.
  • Death benefits.

Pennsylvania

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Railroad workers, longshoremen, and federal employees who already have coverage under other workers’ compensation acts;
  • Agricultural employees who work fewer than 30 days or earn less than $1,200 per year;
  • Employees with religious belief exemptions or because of their executive status.

Covered Employees:

  • An employee who works for an employer with at least one employee in the state of Pennsylvania;
  • Employees working outside the state as long as the employer is principally located in Pennsylvania.

Benefits Provided:

  • Physician or health care provider services, including chiropractors;
  • Related surgical and medical services;
  • Hospital treatment, services, and supplies;
  • Prescription medications;
  • Orthopedic appliances;
  • Permanent and temporary partial and total disability.

Rhode Island

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of sole proprietors;
  • Partners;
  • Real estate agents; 
  • Agricultural employees;
  • Domestic servants;
  • Police;
  • Firefighters;
  • Federal employees. 

Covered Employees:

  • Employees who work for employers with one or more workers.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical expenses;
  • Lost wages;
  • Medical treatments;
  • Disfigurement benefits;
  • Loss of use benefits;
  • Dependency allowance;
  • Rehabilitation services.

South Carolina

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Businesses with fewer than four employees;
  • Employees of sole proprietors;
  • Partners;
  • Certain real estate, agricultural, and domestic service employees.

Covered Employees:

  • Employees who work for businesses with four or more employees, including: 
    • Nonprofit organizations;
    • General contractors;
    • Independent contractors.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical expenses, including surgery and hospitalization;
  • Compensation for lost time;
  • Permanent disability;
  • Medical supplies;
  • Prosthetic devices;
  • Prescriptions;
  • Death benefits.

South Dakota

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Domestic servants working fewer than 20 hours per week;
  • Farm or agricultural workers;
  • Real estate agents;
  • Truck owner-operators;
  • Other independent contractors;
  • Certain government officials;
  • Workfare participants;
  • Sole proprietors, partners, and members of LLCs.

Covered Employees:

  • No employers in South Dakota must carry workers’ compensation coverage for their employees, although it’s recommended.

Benefits Provided:

  • Death benefits, including 67% of the employee’s average weekly;
  • Medical expenses;
  • Lost wages.

Tennessee

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Employees of sole proprietors that own 100% of the business’ assets;
  • Corporate officers; 
  • LLC company members who have at least a 20% ownership interest;
  • Partnership partners who have at least a 20% ownership interest. 

Covered Employees:

  • Employees who work for employers with five or more workers;
  • All employees in the construction business or trades;
  • Employees in the coal mining industry;
  • Family members;
  • Part-time employees;

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical care for work-related injuries and illnesses, including: 
    • Emergency services;
    • Hospitalization;
    • Travel reimbursement;
    • Crutches;
    • Nursing assistance;
    • Psychological services;
    • Prescription eyeglasses;
    • Hospitalization;
    • Prescription medications;
    • Dental work.
  • Partial wage replacement, up to 66.6% of the employee’s weekly salary up to a maximum of $752;
  • Permanent and temporary partial and total disability;
  • Death benefits.

Texas

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • State and local government employees;
  • Farm laborers;
  • Domestic help;
  • Sole proprietors;
  • Partners;
  • LLC members.

Covered Employees:

  • Employees who work for employers with five or more workers.

Benefits Provided:

  • Lost income (temporary, impairment, supplemental, and lifetime);
  • Medical costs;
  • Death benefits, including burial.

Utah

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Individuals with no employees;
  • Statutory employees;
  • Certain sole proprietorships;
  • Some partnerships;
  • Members of limited liability corporations (LLCs).

Covered Employees:

  • Most employees are covered in the state.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical expenses;
  • Lost wages;
  • Death benefits.

Vermont

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Elected officials to state and local governments;
  • Some nonprofit religious, charitable, and educational organizations;
  • Casual labor of not more than $50.00;
  • Insurance agents or solicitors, who are paid solely by commission;
  • Sole proprietors, partners, or family members;
  • Railroad employees;
  • Foreign vessel services;
  • Some fishing services;
  • Some students;
  • Volunteers.

Covered Employees:

  • Mostly everyone, including corporate officers.

Benefits Provided:

  • Temporary, permanent, partial, and total disability benefits;
  • Death benefits;
  • Wage replacement;
  • Medical benefits;
  • Vocational rehabilitation.

Virginia

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Independent contractors;
  • LLC members with no employees.

Covered Employees:

  • Employees of employers with more than two workers, including:
    • Part-time, seasonal, and temporary workers;
    • Minors;
    • Trainees;
    • Immigrants;
    • Family members.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical;
  • Lost wages;
  • Temporary, permanent, partial, and total disability benefits;
  • Death benefits.

Washington

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Certain workers named as officers;
  • Some independent contractors;
  • Volunteers who receive nothing of monetary value in exchange for their work;
  • Some domestic workers in private homes, as long as they don’t work more than 40 hours per week;
  • Employees tasked with gardening, maintenance, or repair work for a private home;
  • Someone working for aid from a charitable or religious organization;
  • Certain musicians and entertainers.

Covered Employees:

  • Any business with one or more employees must carry workers’ comp.

Benefits Provided:

  • Approved medical, hospital, and related services;
  • Partial wage replacement;
  • Payment for partial or total disabilities.
  • Death benefits.

West Virginia

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Independent contractors;
  • Employees who sign a waiver in certain circumstances.

Covered Employees:

  • All businesses with one or more employees must provide workers’ comp coverage.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical costs;
  • Missed wages;
  • Disability coverage;
  • Death benefits.

Wisconsin

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Certain independent contractors;
  • Partnerships that have partners only;
  • Sole proprietors, partners, and members of LLCs;
  • Domestic servants;
  • Volunteers;
  • Some real estate agents.

Covered Employees:

  • Employees in the state who work for a business with three or more full-time or part-time workers (includes out-of-state employers with employees located in Wisconsin);
  • Certain farm workers.

Benefits Provided:

  • Medical, surgical, and hospital treatments and supplies, except for a physical therapist, masseur or masseuse, or a pain clinic;
  • Two-thirds of an injured worker’s weekly wage, up to the maximum rate;
  • Rehabilitation training;
  • Death benefits.

Wyoming

Program Administrator:

Exempt Employees:

  • Casual laborers;
  • Professional athletes;
  • Domestic workers in private households;
  • Federal government employees;
  • Certain volunteers;
  • Elected public officials or government appointees;
  • Some child daycare or babysitting services;
  • Independent contractors.

Covered Employees:

  • All employers with employees must carry workers’ comp.

Benefits Provided:

  • Lost wages (the greater of two-thirds of your monthly gross wages, or 30% of the statewide average monthly wage, whichever is greater);
  • Medical expenses;
  • Temporary and permanent disabilities;
  • Death benefits.

Work With An Experienced Local Lawyer

Hire an experienced workers’ compensation attorney as soon as the insurer or your employer shows signs of making your recovery difficult. If your injury involves an occupational illness or a cumulative injury, you may also benefit from a knowledgeable lawyer. An attorney will fight on your behalf for your rights to benefits as well as for the maximum amount of compensation. Retain the help you need at this difficult time in your life.

Submit a request online or call us today at (866) 345-6784 to get in touch with an attorney in your area!

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